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2700 Silverside Rd.
Suite 3B
Wilmington, DE 19810

(302) 478-1694



What Is Sesamoiditis?

Tuesday, 05 October 2021 00:00

Sesamoid bones are connected to tendons instead of other bones or can be deeply embedded in muscle tissue. The largest sesamoid bone is the kneecap. Two other petite sesamoid bones, the size of corn kernels, are located at the base of the toe in the ball of the foot. When these bones become stressed due to overuse from activities such as ballet dancing, running, playing baseball or similar sports, the tendons surrounding the sesamoid bones become inflamed and painful. This is known as sesamoiditis. Check with a podiatrist if you suspect you are afflicted with sesamoiditis. Sometimes bruising can occur, and if it does it is normally mild. You can cushion the bruise with padding and avoid tight constricting shoes or other sources of friction. Podiatrists can help treat sesamoiditis with icing, compression bandages, and more, while prescribing rest and elevation of the affected foot.

Sesamoiditis is an unpleasant foot condition characterized by pain in the balls of the feet. If you think you’re struggling with sesamoiditis, contact Dr. Alexander Terris of Total Foot Care. Our doctor will treat your condition thoroughly and effectively.

Sesamoiditis

Sesamoiditis is a condition of the foot that affects the ball of the foot. It is more common in younger people than it is in older people. It can also occur with people who have begun a new exercise program, since their bodies are adjusting to the new physical regimen. Pain may also be caused by the inflammation of tendons surrounding the bones. It is important to seek treatment in its early stages because if you ignore the pain, this condition can lead to more serious problems such as severe irritation and bone fractures.

Causes of Sesamoiditis

  • Sudden increase in activity
  • Increase in physically strenuous movement without a proper warm up or build up
  • Foot structure: those who have smaller, bonier feet or those with a high arch may be more susceptible

Treatment for sesamoiditis is non-invasive and simple. Doctors may recommend a strict rest period where the patient forgoes most physical activity. This will help give the patient time to heal their feet through limited activity. For serious cases, it is best to speak with your doctor to determine a treatment option that will help your specific needs.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Wilmington, DE . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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